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Alice Shade
June 3rd, 2007, 03:13 AM
No.

It`s about books. Favorite books, hated books, right books, wrong books - whatever.

If you have something to say about books - put it here.

Alice Shade
June 3rd, 2007, 03:15 AM
http://www.laweekly.com/news/news/ray-bradbury-fahrenheit-451-misinterpreted/16524/

Let`s start with that. Anyone read the Fahrenheit 451?

I`m not sure on this one.

For me, it`s always been a twofer... People start to think books are "too hard" to read, and then government uses that to turn them into mindless yes-man TV-drones.

Bradbury here claims it was only about the disinterest in books... yet, so many people think it`s about censorship.

What thinks you?

AaronD
June 3rd, 2007, 04:57 AM
For me, anything by Douglas Adams, Gary Paulsen, Carl Sagan, Donald E. Westlake, and Philip Pullman are especially close to my heart, and the LotR trilogy ranks up there as well... Out of the Pullman books, the His Dark Materials trilogy and the Sally Lockhart trilogy are my favorites. Anyway, I also loved Ringworld, The Mote in God's Eye, A Beautiful Mind, Secrets of Houdini, and quite a few more books. I'm actually quite fond of the Goosebumps series by R.L. Stein, as those books motivated me to learn how to read.


EDIT: I just learned that the Lockhart series is a quartet! Time to go to the bookstore again!

Kokoba
June 3rd, 2007, 02:34 PM
Feeeeeh Gary Paulsen. Could never get into any of his books.

I tore through Boxcar Children, Nancy Drew, Goosebumps, and Animorphs books when I was a kid. I also liked The Chronicles of Narnia and The Dark is Rising sequence. Then later Agatha Christie and Redwall and Tamora Pierce and The Hitchhiker's Guide series (the first time around). And by high school I was spending most of my reading time reading for class. Which isn't to say I didn't enjoy it (well, some of them I didn't) but I didn't have much time to really think about them. Same goes for reading now, though now I have my summers more free. I like Matt Ridley, Stephen Jay Gould, and Henry David Thoreau. And John Milton.

MeTHoD-X
June 3rd, 2007, 08:07 PM
I'm actually quite fond of the Goosebumps series by R.L. Stein, as those books motivated me to learn how to read.

It's funny you should say that because that's exactly why I love reading so much to this day. I started reading R. L. Stein when I was around 10 years old. I had a monthly subscription and everything. They're still stashed away somewhere at my parents house.

Serenstar
June 3rd, 2007, 10:10 PM
Do you really want to ask me about books? :D I spend most of my spare time reading.

Ok here goes...
My favourite series is Manda Scott's Boudica series. I've yet to meet anyone (online or in *real* life) who's read them. :( I love pretty much anything by Bernard Cornwall. I also love Simon Scarrow's Eagle series.
Brian John's Angel series is amazing as well. It's based around the town and mountian that I grew up on. :D
Now onto the Classics. Jane Eyre. Anything by Jane Austin. I'm not a big fan of Dickens although I have read nearly all of his works.
I'm not going to post all the books I like. We have over 5,000 books in our house so it would take a long time.:D

Oooo.. I also love Lord of the Rings.

(I get slightly hyper about books, you may be able to tell.)

Vexx
June 3rd, 2007, 10:29 PM
I admit I'm a Harry Potter nerd. I do wait untill midnight to buy the newest one and i read through the whole thing in a matter of hours. I could probably answer any question you have about it....:B but you've gotta admit that it's pretty original for that genre of writing. When people think of witches, they think of the Wicked Witch of the West most of the time....

My favorite author is Stephen King. He has such a twisted mind, I love all his books so much! I love The Shining and his short story The Chattery Teeth the best. Insomnia was also very great.

My favorite series of books are the Everworld series. It's almost impossible for me to explain how weird this series is...So go here to see! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everworld)

Kokoba
June 3rd, 2007, 10:45 PM
Original? Pah! Rowling is just taking pop culture fantasy ideas and throwing them together in an unappealing literary casserole with some cutesy sprinkles for good measure. I think she's actually said that she "doesn't write fantasy," and I 100% agree with that.

Garghleblah. People talk about Harry Potter "getting kids to read again," but hey, if the only thing they're reading is Harry Potter, I'm sorry, that doesn't count.

Chronicles of Narnia, The Dark is Rising, Lord of the Rings, Terry Pratchett, Neil Gaiman, Ursula K LeGuin, Anne McCafferey, Philip Pullman, George R R Martin...those are original. Those are revolutionary or thought-provoking. Harry Potter is just trendy.

Grrgrrrgrrrgrrr. Rawr. I hate Harry Potter. I'm going to go back in my corner and read my Chronicles of Narnia again now, Christian influences be damned! =P


(Every once in a while I need to blow of some steam as it comes to Harry Potter. You can like it or not, I don't really care [since it seems all of my friends tend to be big fans], I'm just letting out the rage.)

Kokoba
June 3rd, 2007, 10:48 PM
Also, must say the article on Fahrenheit 451 is an interesting read. I wonder if Bradbury has anything to say about the movie Equilibrium.

Alice Shade
June 3rd, 2007, 11:05 PM
I have to agree here.

First three Harry Potter books were more or less "light reading" for me. Read while waiting on something, or in some interim. Fourth and so on.... SUCKS. BIG TIME. MAJOR TIME. HUMONGOUS TIME.

I`m serious - if I`d wanted angst, I`d go downtown into first emo bar I`ll stumble across. I don`t want to freaking pay and litter my house with +700 pages of pretentious posers yelling their fucking heads off while getting killed in most idiotic cases possible.

Harry is a fucking moron, to sum it up. He could`ve killed Voldemort by the end of third book, if he wasn`t so retarded.

MeTHoD-X
June 3rd, 2007, 11:09 PM
What's wrong with emo culture? Everyone is so hostile toward it.

Alice Shade
June 3rd, 2007, 11:32 PM
Wrong?

They are clingy and annoying, that`s what.

I have nothing against people who LISTEN to "emo" music, but I DO mind people, who think virtual stranger should be interested in their bemoanings of how depressed they are because of lack of <insert useless bauble> in their life, and how they are going to commit suicide because their parents won`t buy them that.

So, yea, emos are ANNOYING, from big letter. Not because they devote attention to their emotions, but because they assume EVERYONE`s attention must be devoted to their emotions.

Vexx
June 3rd, 2007, 11:34 PM
Kokoba ~ ._. I do admit that it's not very original, but more original than alot of books I've read. Those others that you've listed can squish Potter to a pulp....

And yes, I am hoping some twist would make Harry die in the end. I'm hoping this very very badly. But I've read 'em all and I just want to read the last one so I can be like "Yes! It's over! The Potter no longer as a hold on me!"
But I still like it. >.> Sue me.

AaronD
June 4th, 2007, 02:38 AM
I didn't like Redwall that much. The first few books were pretty good, but then they all had the same exact story with the names changed 'round a little. The series got boring fast. Oh, and I used to love the Everworld series. And I never could get into Terry Pratchett's books, try as I might.

Wallis89
June 4th, 2007, 02:57 PM
I just love all the books by J.R.R. Tolkien and the ones edited by his son. The background story is so great it's impossible (at least for me) to understand where he got everything from.

I also like all the books by Dan Brown. Ok it might be a bit main stream but who cares. The books is a good mix of fact and fiction. After a while you almost belive everything is fact :) .

Then we allso have probably the funniest book I have ever read The Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy. It's the only book I have read by Douglas Adams but he got great imagination.

I have also read Harry Potter and I like them, sure they aren't great but good. A bit easy to read maybe.

jon_hill987
June 4th, 2007, 02:58 PM
I really like Pratchett books. Another favourite of mine is the riftwar/serpentwar sagas by Raymond E. Feist.

Digs
June 4th, 2007, 03:57 PM
I don't think I could possibly hit all the books I've admired over the years, but I'll tell you what I'm reading now.

I've got a copy of Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman in my bag right now, and in my spare time I'm reading (an almanac of complete world knowledge compiled with instructive annotation by the author, John Hodgman, in) The Areas of My Expertise by John Hodgman.

Lemme give a shout-out to Louis Sachar and the Wayside School, also a nod to Hans Christian Anderson. Reading integral to my development as a person a go-go.

Oh, before I forget, big thanks to Ayn Rand for making Anthem, or as I like to call it, Atlas Shrugged in a Mere Couple-Hundred Pages.

Kokoba
June 4th, 2007, 07:29 PM
I didn't like Redwall that much. The first few books were pretty good, but then they all had the same exact story with the names changed 'round a little. The series got boring fast. Oh, and I used to love the Everworld series. And I never could get into Terry Pratchett's books, try as I might.
The first Redwall? Awesome.

Now that it's like installment number 5923...let it go out gracefully, Mr. Jacques. Like Applegate did with Animorphs.


Vexx: Don't take my Harry hating personally. I don't think less of anyone for liking the books. =P

One of my friends just recommended me that Hodgman book, Digs. Synchronicity!

Serenstar
June 4th, 2007, 08:15 PM
How did I forget Pratchett? I've only read about 10 of his books but I'm going to raid my brother's books (I think he's missing 3 of the discworld books: he's got the rest) now he's off in the army. :D I loved the ones I have have read though.

Redwall! I like them. I've got 15. :D (Read more from the library) The ones from Lord Brocktree to The Long Partol (I think that's 12 books) are brilliant (espically The Long Patrol!) but after that they do go downhill. The Taggerung and Triss are good as well.

Harry Potter. :icon_evil: I used to like the books then the films came out. Ruined the books for me. I know it stupid. The films were so goddamn awful that I realised how crap the books were. I do have the last book on pre-order but that's because the Mothership ordered it as a surprise for me. I admit I can't wait for the last book to come out but that's because Harry will die and this stupid cult (only word for it) will hopefully end.

Another book I hate: the Da Vinic Code. He's writing style was awful and the plot was so predicable. I really cannot believe that some Christians actually see it as a threat! It a work of fiction! OK so it says that everything in the book is true. Skip back one page and you've got all the legal jumbo which states that everything in the book is a product of the author's imagination and is not based on true events. reason why I know this? I actually had to explain this to people.

Kokoba
June 4th, 2007, 09:59 PM
Apparently Dan Brown lifted pretty much all of The Da Vinci code line by line from some OTHER book. Or not line by line, but rather the story, idea, the structure, events, etc.

In any case, it's just plain bad.

Wallis89
June 4th, 2007, 10:05 PM
Apparently Dan Brown lifted pretty much all of The Da Vinci code line by line from some OTHER book. Or not line by line, but rather the story, idea, the structure, events, etc.

In any case, it's just plain bad.

OK you realise how the book will end from page one. But I at least and a couple of my friends never realised who the bad guy was until it was obvious.

P.S He took the plot from "Holy Blood, Holy Grail". D.S

Loki
June 4th, 2007, 10:34 PM
In addition to anything by Pratchett and Adams. Rob Grant and Doug Naylor - wrote the Red Dwarf Series together.
One of my favourite authors has to be Iain Banks - either his space opera as Iain M Banks (the Culture novels esp) or as Iain Banks - pretty wierd Contemporary Culture (The Wasp Factory, Whit, Complicity etc.
.
I'm trying to get through "The Illuminatus! Trilogy" Shea & Wilson - it's not that it's bad - just a nightmare to keep track of it!

Alice Shade
June 4th, 2007, 11:40 PM
"The Illuminatus!"? Liked them, trying to find the original.

Also.. The Eternal Golden Braid is pretty interesting.

Kokoba
June 5th, 2007, 12:43 AM
OK you realise how the book will end from page one. But I at least and a couple of my friends never realised who the bad guy was until it was obvious.

P.S He took the plot from "Holy Blood, Holy Grail". D.S
No, I'm not talking about Holy Blood, Holy Grail (though that book is a much better read on the topic, if as just as wildly speculative in places). I mean another fiction book, apparently. Can't recall the title at the moment.

Illuminatus...I think I need to start dropping acid to make it through that book.

Digs
June 5th, 2007, 02:30 AM
One of my friends just recommended me that Hodgman book, Digs. Synchronicity!

Pretty good book! I wouldn't read it all at once tho'.

AaronD
June 5th, 2007, 04:32 AM
JK Rowling has stated that she is NOT going to kill off Harry Potter in the last book, by the way. Sorry to crush your hopes, Serenstar.

Serenstar
June 5th, 2007, 01:08 PM
Apparently Dan Brown lifted pretty much all of The Da Vinci code line by line from some OTHER book. Or not line by line, but rather the story, idea, the structure, events, etc.

In any case, it's just plain bad.

Ah yeah I remember. There was a lawsuit about I think. They lost though :icon_evil: :icon_evil:

JK Rowling has stated that she is NOT going to kill off Harry Potter in the last book, by the way. Sorry to crush your hopes, Serenstar.

Bugger. Well then he's in the hospital.

Lunchbox
June 5th, 2007, 01:48 PM
I'm forced to admit I'm a bit of a mainstream reader. Pratchett, Adams, Feist, Eddings, Gemmel, Tolkein, Nix, etc. I own the entire collections of all of them. I'm pretty much a fantasy whore, but about once a month I like to deviate onto something heavier and more thought provoking like Stephen Hawkins, Graham Hancock, Robert Bauval, etc.

As for recommending anything, top of my list of recent reads are Chariots of the Gods by Erik von Daniken (old, but fun and the basis for both Stargate and Battlestar Galactica) and A Brief History of Almost Everything by Bill Bryson - pretty much the layman's version of the Hawkins book A Brief History of Time and a truly fantastic book.

Wallis89
June 5th, 2007, 04:50 PM
No, I'm not talking about Holy Blood, Holy Grail (though that book is a much better read on the topic, if as just as wildly speculative in places). I mean another fiction book, apparently. Can't recall the title at the moment.

I didn't know it was based on any other book. Damn I'm soon 18 and there are still things I don't know ;).

Loki
June 5th, 2007, 05:14 PM
Alice - I don't know "The Eternal Golden Braid" - the closest match I could find was by Douglas R. Hofstadter - is that the one?
.
Have you ever heard of David Icke? Was a sports presenter in the UK before he flew off the planet - he seldom visits Earth these days:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Icke :wiki:
.
Looks like he read Illuminatus! whilst taking the same stuff the authors were obviously keen on :D. There's a great quote in there about;

".....My children were devastated because their dad was a figure of ridicule."

I thought - well, call yourself the son of god, a channel for the Christ, claim the Queen, Blair and Bush are alien lizards (hmmmm!) and ask to be called "Godhead"
Asking for it really!

I love to read other peoples conspiracies. Sorry to all the Dan Brown fans but he was Scooby Doo compared to the acid addled paranoia of Shea & Wilson.
Howard the Dolphin agrees!

Kokoba
June 5th, 2007, 07:27 PM
Oh man, this is too good.... "prominent figures are reptilian, including George W. Bush, Queen Elizabeth II, Kris Kristofferson, and Boxcar Willie."

George W. Bush? Okay, I'll buy it. Elizabeth II? Fine. Kris Kristofferson? Boxcar Willie? Country music rules the world?

Kiley Kaos
June 6th, 2007, 01:05 AM
Honestly, Im a huge Harry Potter nerd.
Glasses and scars on the posters, and all.

Besides Potter-mania, I like Stephen King books, especially Rose Madder and Desperation.


I will go insane if I dont get my hands on the book 'Every body hurts' I currently dont know the author. But I know I wanna read it, if for anything, laughs.

PotatoeOfDoom
June 6th, 2007, 02:14 AM
JK Rowling has stated that she is NOT going to kill off Harry Potter in the last book, by the way. Sorry to crush your hopes, Serenstar.

WHAT?!?!
NOOOOOOOOOOOO
thats what i've been reading them for too!

ah well. my favorite author is Orson Scott Card. i LOOVED his book "Enders Game"
i also like:
Piers Anthony, Asimov, Jules Verne, Anne Mcaffrey, Heinlein, Melanie Rawn, Susan Cooper, Terry Brooks, Ursula K. Leguin, ummm... thats mostly what i have on my bookshelf, but there's hundreds of other authors i like, their names just escape me at the moment :)

About Orson Scott Card, i've read almost every series he's written, not just Enders Game.

Kokoba
June 6th, 2007, 03:14 AM
My respect for Orson Scott Card dropped a little when I found out what a flaming Mormon he was.

Ender's Game and that contemporary take on Russian fairy tales (forget the title, I think it's Enchanted) are good, but I feel sort of icky inside when I promote/enjoy/purchase pieces of entertainment from people who have views that I find borderline morally questionable (eg, Card's stance on homosexuality).

Has anyone else read Meindert DeJong's The Wheel on the School?

PotatoeOfDoom
June 6th, 2007, 03:22 AM
well, while i don't approve of his oppinionsthey are his oppinions and i respedct that. however, his views don't change the quality of his writing.

Kokoba
June 6th, 2007, 03:38 AM
No, it doesn't change the quality at all, and while he is free to have his own opinions, I'd also point out that hate is not a family value.

I just am perhaps more...personally involved with my entertainment than most. It's hard to explain, really. I just really do care about the biography and personal lives of people whose work I admire.

PotatoeOfDoom
June 6th, 2007, 03:47 AM
ok.
honestly, i know close to nothing about most of the authors i like. yes i may hear something here or there but i never really get into that kind of stuff

AaronD
June 6th, 2007, 04:27 AM
I loved Enders Game too, by the way. And I agree with most of the authors Potatoe stated being good, though not among my very favorite.

PotatoeOfDoom
June 6th, 2007, 04:35 AM
well to each his own:)
btw, how many posts do i have to have in order to become a minister?
i just saw your "Church fo google Minister" icon thing and asked... lmao yeah

AaronD
June 6th, 2007, 04:53 AM
It's not a matter of post count. In fact, I became one before I even registered for the site, but that's a different matter. Ministers are right now elected by the current ministers.

PotatoeOfDoom
June 6th, 2007, 04:57 AM
ok. so what must i do to become one?

Kokoba
June 6th, 2007, 05:20 AM
ok.
honestly, i know close to nothing about most of the authors i like. yes i may hear something here or there but i never really get into that kind of stuff
I don't go digging around but some things just sort of pop up.

Of course I also bounce around in Wikipedia a lot in my spare time.


Anyway, you become a minister when another minister suggests and a majority agrees. What does it take to be suggested? Posting a lot of quality (eg, helpful or insightful) posts, sticking around for a while, getting to know people... Note that you don't get any perks except access to the Minister's Lounge, which, while neat to contribute directly to the creative aspects of the site (in a way), does not afford you much in terms of board "power" (minister != moderator).

PotatoeOfDoom
June 6th, 2007, 05:24 AM
well i don't care much about power, i just want the label cus i think it would be cool, and i really think this is an awesome site, so i would wanna contribute any way i could (except money cus im broke lmao).people on a lot of other forums i used to visit were jackasses, but this ones fun and nice

Kokoba
June 6th, 2007, 05:36 AM
If you want to use the "Minister" graphic on your webpage or forum sig elsewhere to advertise, I don't think anyone would object. :)

PotatoeOfDoom
June 6th, 2007, 05:37 AM
ok im gonna use that then. if any moderators don't want me to though just tell me and i'll take it down

Alice Shade
June 6th, 2007, 05:40 AM
To: Loki

Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid: A metaphorical fugue on minds and machines in the spirit of Lewis Carroll (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gödel,_Escher,_Bach) - that`s the one I`m talking about.

________________________

To: Potatoe Of Doom.

If you mean bar in the signature, check the main site - there are explanations how to stick one in your signature. Promotions Page, I think.

You can use Member of Minister as you see fit - here or on other forums.

As for the title on the left...

Let me put it this way. People are nominated, when all-around opinion of them is favorable (one way or another). It happens sporadically, and there is no common procedure, per ce, to become one. Post count does not really matters, per ce, but if you plan to make into ministry with ten posts, they ought to be nothing short of profoundly-groundshaking. ^_^

PotatoeOfDoom
June 6th, 2007, 05:43 AM
i want to put it on my myspace, but they only use HTML can you turn the minister code into HTML for me? or tell me how to do it myself?

Serenstar
June 6th, 2007, 09:56 AM
i want to put it on my myspace, but they only use HTML can you turn the minister code into HTML for me? or tell me how to do it myself?

Copy and paste:

<a href="http://www.thechurchofgoogle.org"><img src="http://www.thechurchofgoogle.org/Images/promo_material/cog_minister.png"></a>

Should work. I tried it out on my myspace :D

Alice Shade
June 6th, 2007, 10:03 AM
Actually, I`ve already explained that privately.

Let`s not spam here with offtopic messages, alright? This is thread about books.

________________________________________________________________

Speaking of books. I`m gonna be sneaky here - anyone read anything by Lewis Carroll aside from "Alice in Wonderland" and "Behind the looking glass"?

Loki
June 6th, 2007, 01:21 PM
Thanks Alice - that was the one I found. I've not read it but I will. That's why I love these threads - I always learn about new (to me) authors.

Re. Lewis Carroll - I read "The Hunting of the Snark" and "The Jabberwocky" for my English Lit. O'Level (taken at 16 in UK - now called GCSE).

One I should have mentioned before is "Woman on the Edge of Time" by Marge Piercy:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woman_on_the_edge_of_time

Hell of a good read. As is Sophie's World - Jostein Gaarder:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophie%27s_World

Iduna
June 6th, 2007, 07:09 PM
Oh, I adore books, if only I had more time to read!
I read a lot of work- and life-related stuff, so I usual enjoy 'lighter' literature for relaxing.
Used to read Karl May, James Harriot and Stephen King when I was a kid ;) right after the Narnia Chronicles.
Tried Tolkien, but I found it too boring to come to the end... (great literature, though).
Love Pratchett and Douglas Adams, George Orwell, too...
I also liked Dan Brown, but just 'Angels and Demons' and 'Da Vinci Code'. No idea if it was plagiary, I liked it. (I was in Rome when I read Angels and Demons, funny thing to actually go to the places!!)
Fantasy: forget Potter, read Weis/Hickman's 'Death Gate' or Anne Rice the Vampire Chronicles. Good stuff, IMHO.
Otherwise I also like Noah Gordon and Ken Follets book of building a cathedral (dunno the original title).
Can't think of other books right now, but I've been through a lot.

Iduna
June 6th, 2007, 07:12 PM
Ah, Loki, yes, I forgot Sophie's World! Great book, read it two times (and it's tough!).
The only book I've read more than 5 times is L. Stevenson's Treasure Island ;)

Lunchbox
June 7th, 2007, 07:33 AM
Loki, O-Levels/GCSE's seem to have changed a lot since I did them in '89. I don't think imagination was a quality encouraged in UK teachers back then seeing as we got stuck with To Kill a Mockingbird and Lord of the Flies. Both good books in their own right, no question, but hell, you can only psychoanalyse Boo Radley so many times before the novelty wears off.

PotatoeOfDoom
June 7th, 2007, 07:40 AM
Loki, O-Levels/GCSE's seem to have changed a lot since I did them in '89. I don't think imagination was a quality encouraged in UK teachers back then seeing as we got stuck with To Kill a Mockingbird and Lord of the Flies. Both good books in their own right, no question, but hell, you can only psychoanalyse Boo Radley so many times before the novelty wears off.

Oh my Google.
I totally agree with you.
This year when i was in 8th grade, we had to do 10th grade honors work for "To Kill A Mockingbird"
My Google it was hell haha.

Serenstar
June 7th, 2007, 11:02 AM
Loki, O-Levels/GCSE's seem to have changed a lot since I did them in '89. I don't think imagination was a quality encouraged in UK teachers back then seeing as we got stuck with To Kill a Mockingbird and Lord of the Flies. Both good books in their own right, no question, but hell, you can only psychoanalyse Boo Radley so many times before the novelty wears off.

Not really. I did Lord of the Flies for my English Literature GCSE. The exam was the 22nd May this year :D The other books were Of Mice and Men and To Kill a Mockingbird. I wish I could have don To Kill a Mockingbird as it is such a great book but no, I had to do that pile of crap call Lord of the Flies. As soon as I got back home from the exam I burnt my copy of LotF which had all my notes in it. Never, ever going to read it.
My mother also did Lord of the Flies for her English Lit O level which was 33 years ago :D

Another book which I love is The Sight by David Clement-Davies. A very good book.

Anyhoo, I can't type any more seeing as I've got my second English Language exam in less than 3 hours time. :(

Lunchbox
June 7th, 2007, 12:09 PM
That's a bit sad, Seren. Almost as sad as burning books...

Serenstar
June 7th, 2007, 04:57 PM
That's a bit sad, Seren. Almost as sad as burning books...

It's the only book I have ever burnt and is the last one that I will burn. I'm never going to read it again and nobody else can read it seeing as it's covered in my notes which I can't read sometime. So there was no point in me keeping it or giving it away. Plus it represented two years of hell in that classroom (I hated English) so it was kind of symbolic watching it burn. :icon_twisted:

Loki
June 7th, 2007, 09:25 PM
Lunchbox:
I took my O'Levels in 1985 (old giffer alert :)) so I partly agree with you.
I loved "Lord of the Flies" - so much so that I've even seen the play a couple of times - I like it when authors aren't afraid to dig into the dark recesses of our nature.

I found Humanities, Arts and Languages a complete waste of time at school - I was a Biology, Chemistry and Physics person.

It was only towards the end of my final year of my first degree that I discovered books for enjoyment. Started with "Equal Rites" by Pratchett - a girlfriend got me into it - I've never looked back.

The choice of books to study at GCSE is pretty varied I think (I'll check if you like). I suspect it's down to the school/teacher to make the final decision.
That said - I wish The Management could come-up with an interesting way to teach - I was so bored at school!

To those of you currently at school - go to Uni. it's a different world :D

Kokoba
June 8th, 2007, 02:29 AM
My objection to Lord of the Flies is that a similar thing ended up happening in real life...and it didn't turn out anything like the book. The boys worked together instead of killing each other. William Golding is too pessimistic as it concerns people, I think.

Lunchbox
June 8th, 2007, 07:52 AM
One can happen as easily as the other, Kokoba. It just depends on the personalities involved.

Loki, I came back to South Africa after my O Levels and the first set piece we did in literature was a study of Bob Dylan's Masters of War. A very refreshing change from the usual.

Loki
June 9th, 2007, 03:09 PM
Lunchbox (sorry it's taken me so long to reply, I'm easily distracted)

Put like that I now know what you mean :)

Slightly off topic, we can move it if needed, what are your views on the current A'Level row - that they are getting to a point where they are meaningless - I know you're not in the UK - just interested in your view.

Lunchbox
June 11th, 2007, 09:21 AM
That's a bit of a tough one. The subject of education isn't nearly as cut and dry as it used to be.

From the start let me say I believe you can never learn too much. I believe everyone, children in particular, should be encouraged to take every opportunity they get to learn whatever they can. Purely from that standpoint, yes, I think everyone should do their A Levels. It's not going to do any harm, put it that way.

On the other hand, because school is there to lay the groundwork for any career, schools are forced to create very broad and generalised curriculums in order to cater to as many people as possible. This means that you could go through 15 years of school without actually learning what you want to. Personally, I hated my last two years at school because I knew what I wanted to do as a career but couldn't focus on it my school.

I think it's going to end up depending on each person in the end. I don't think those extra two years (if it's still two years?) in school doing A levels is going to do any harm, but I think if people realise before that what they want to do and have the opportunity to focus on it instead of doing A levels, it shouldn't be held against them. As an employer, I would be far more interested in the person who was focused on their career path from 16, even if they spent two years in some shoddy community college instead of grinding out their A levels.

Alice Shade
June 11th, 2007, 09:48 AM
Well... I`m not sure about USA, but here in former USSR this was solved in more or less straightforward manner.

Schools provided basic knowledge (9-11 years). Cirriculum is one for everyone in this particular school. Parents can pick school with certain lean - school for gifted, school with mathematical lean, school with humanitary lean, mediocre school. That is about it.

School education is still roughly the same, with some extras depending on particular school, and it`s considered a civic duty to complete school course.

After - one can pick pretty specialised University. I said pretty specialised, but not quite. There`s still an array of mandatory for everyone subjects.

Loki
June 11th, 2007, 04:35 PM
Was really meaning the alleged lowering of the standard of A'Levels.
When I took mine in '87 it was almost unheard of for people to take more than 4 at one go - now 6 isn't uncommon.

The argument with the old A' Levels was that they were too big a jump and too specialised. They were a hell of a jump though but the system did seem to work.

I feel sorry for folks who have to do continuous assessment - means you have to work all year - far better to do sod all for 11 months and cram for one :D

Serenstar
June 11th, 2007, 06:21 PM
That's a bit of a tough one. The subject of education isn't nearly as cut and dry as it used to be.

From the start let me say I believe you can never learn too much. I believe everyone, children in particular, should be encouraged to take every opportunity they get to learn whatever they can. Purely from that standpoint, yes, I think everyone should do their A Levels. It's not going to do any harm, put it that way.

On the other hand, because school is there to lay the groundwork for any career, schools are forced to create very broad and generalised curriculums in order to cater to as many people as possible. This means that you could go through 15 years of school without actually learning what you want to. Personally, I hated my last two years at school because I knew what I wanted to do as a career but couldn't focus on it my school.

I think it's going to end up depending on each person in the end. I don't think those extra two years (if it's still two years?) in school doing A levels is going to do any harm, but I think if people realise before that what they want to do and have the opportunity to focus on it instead of doing A levels, it shouldn't be held against them. As an employer, I would be far more interested in the person who was focused on their career path from 16, even if they spent two years in some shoddy community college instead of grinding out their A levels.

I'm starting my AS levels in September. :D I have no idea what I want to do as a career but I do know that I want to go to university. So I picked my A level courses according to what I'm good at, what I enjoy, the courses I want to do at university and which ones looked interesting. I actually want to do 5 A levels but the collage I'm going to won't let anyone do more than 4 AS levels and then 3 A levels. :icon_evil: They say it's too much work and that you don't need more than 3 A levels. Hello? I've done an extra GCSE onto of 10 others and you only actually need 5 GCSEs. Stupid people. :icon_evil:

Loki
June 11th, 2007, 07:03 PM
Can you not do one subject at evening classes?

Lunchbox
June 12th, 2007, 07:44 AM
I see what you mean, Loki.

Again, tough call. Giving students the opportunity to take 6 or more just maintains the broad spectrum of the education they're getting. The old system forced them to begin specialising earlier which I believe lends itself towards focusing students on goals and ambitions.

So yeah, I prefer the old system. When I finished my GCSE's I knew what industry I wanted to make a career in and which A levels I wanted to take (even though I didn't get to take them). If I'd been forced to take subjects I didn't want or need to, it wouldn't have given me the focus I needed.

soffee
June 19th, 2007, 09:32 PM
I am also starting my AS next year. My school offered me 5 A levels but frankly I do not like 5 subjects enough to want to do them so i'm doing the norm which is 4. I dont know what i want to do after school. I just need my A levels to get me into a good uni and hopefully i can choose some sort of career path along the way. I've just chosen the subjects that im good at and enjoy and everyone thinks that i am mad because im doing both english and physics which apparently "are not well matched subjects". Personally, i love physics even though my other subjects are english, history and classics. Why do subjects need to match anyway?

Back on the subject of books, does anyone else LOVE Ben Elton?

Loki
June 20th, 2007, 07:01 PM
Hi soffee - good luck with your chosen subjects.

Ben Elton? - I've read Gridlock, Popcorn and This Other Eden. I've also seen Blast from the Past at the theatre.
I like him but not that much - if you want topical comment then Iain Banks is my favourite.
Mind you - I understood Blast from the Past a lot more than The Wasp Factory - that was weird:icon_eek:

Alice Shade
June 20th, 2007, 07:12 PM
Wasp Factory was actually pretty neat.

In schisophrenic way.

Loki
June 20th, 2007, 07:22 PM
It was Alice, but a definite read the book first play. I'm a big fan of Banks:D

soffee
June 20th, 2007, 11:54 PM
Yeah i admit some of his books are a tad wierd but i like them because they all have strong messages besides being very funny. His new one called "Chart Throb" was hilarious. It was based on the whole American Idol/ X-factor/Simon Cowell theme and it really showed how easily an audience can be manipulated by television- it was also serious comedy, i was laughing aloud at may-a-point (but then again im kinda weird like that...)

-AoG-Kero
June 21st, 2007, 09:39 PM
my favorite authors include: Tolkien, Olson S. Card(Ender's Game series), Frank Herbert/Brian Herbert(the Dune Series), Jim Butcher(The Dresden Files), and many others that i wont take the time to name.

I seriously suggest that anyone who likes sci-fi,mystery,magic, or murder to read the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher. Google it to find out more. Basically its like Harry Potter and CSI got together with Sherlock Holmes and had a party. THe party was a good one lol

My Favorite all time books are:
1. Ender's Game (read 8 times)
2. Dune
3. Various books of dresden files

Rand
June 22nd, 2007, 06:36 PM
Love space sci-fi, dystopias, and pointless comedies

-1984
-Dread Empire's Fall series
-Dune (though it was very, very hard to read and not get bored, was still a good-ish book)
-Catch 22
-Revelation Space Series

^ among the few of my favorites.

Have 6 Harry Potter Books, might buy the 7th, I stopped reading at 5. I don't really think Harry is all that great. I generally dislike people who are obsessed with Harry Potter... have a ton of them living near me.

Alice Shade
June 22nd, 2007, 06:47 PM
Same about Potter. I`ve stopped reading mid-fifth, and ever since, had been sputtering vile and vitriol at Potterfans.

-AoG-Kero
June 22nd, 2007, 06:48 PM
Love space sci-fi, dystopias, and pointless comedies
. I generally dislike people who are obsessed with Harry Potter... have a ton of them living near me.

lol dont ever go to a move premier

Rand
June 22nd, 2007, 09:52 PM
Did with a younger sibling, for the younger sibling... three years in a row.

*cringe*

-AoG-Kero
June 23rd, 2007, 03:33 AM
Did with a younger sibling, for the younger sibling... three years in a row.

*cringe*

i feel ur pain

soffee
June 23rd, 2007, 11:06 AM
I must admit i do like harry potter. but im not obsessive, I don't think its any better than any other ordinary book. These stupid series and trilogies though, you get hooked- I have to find out what happens at the end!

Alice Shade
June 23rd, 2007, 11:19 AM
First three books were fine.

Easy reading for when you have nothing to do.

Starting from fourth and down onwards, it`s been angst-emo tripe for appropriately-idiotic teenagers.

In all honesty, Harry could`ve killed Voldemort in fourth book without any doubt. So, starting from the fourth, it`s been just an excercise in how stupid a character can be made.

Loki
June 23rd, 2007, 06:25 PM
I've read the first 4 or 5 Potter books. I really thought they were a rip-off of Terry Pratchett but without the satire.

Sure, they're children's books but look at the children's books Pratchett has written! - "Maurice and His Amazing Educated Rats" and the ones involving Tiffany Aching - witch (wee free men etc), fantastic. Yet written on so many levels.
Not a big Harry Potter fan ;)

Kokoba
June 25th, 2007, 02:57 AM
Rand, I actually was really hooked on Dune from the moment I picked it up. I don't see what was really boring about it. Then again, this was a week where I had nothing else to do with myself except some board games and swimming in a lake, so I read quite a bit.

-AoG-Kero
June 25th, 2007, 04:27 AM
well dune, although a very good book, can sometimes be a slow read for some, and therefore be a bit boring

i loved it though lol

Alice Shade
June 25th, 2007, 12:37 PM
I couldn`t get into Dune, personally. Dunno, why.

Maybe because I started my familiarity with Dune from "Dune 2" game (Which is one of the first games of warcraft/starctaft type.), and was expecting something more warlike.

-AoG-Kero
June 25th, 2007, 04:18 PM
lol i had dune 2000 which is the same but updated...

ya it would seem like it would be more warlike, but in the end of the book it gets pretty war-ish

soffee
June 25th, 2007, 08:17 PM
I also LOVE Phillip Pullman. His Dark Materials- oh my google, (lol) what an imagination. The stories are fantastic!

Wolf
July 6th, 2007, 12:49 PM
the books i like are in no particular order:

the halo saga
scarecrow
ice station
deltora quest
megatokyo best online webcomic :D

and heaps more

gypsygirl
October 23rd, 2007, 12:15 AM
Rand - Have you ever read the "Bio of a Space Tyrant" series by Piers Anthony? I read it years ago, but as I recall I really enjoyed it and I think it may be right up your alley.

Iduna- I think I read the Ken Follet (sp?) that you're talking about. It was called "Pillars of the Earth" or some such. It was a great story.

My first ever "owned" book was given to me for my eighth birthday. It was "Dragon on a Pedestal" and great for fun kid read. I went on to read most of the Xanth series by Piers Anthony, if only I could get my kids to try it.
As an adult my tasted first turned to Stephen King then to Terry Pratchett. I know that my husband is happy that I moved on to T.P. since he used to get sooo concerned when I would giggle while reading S.K. Couldn't help it though, he has a wicked sense of humor.
Lately I've been reading Dave Duncans series "The Great Game". I love that type of book and anyone who has any suggestions along these lines, it would be greatly appreciated.
I read a ton so I'm always willing to try a new genre. So actually all suggestions are welcome.

wuzupbling22
October 27th, 2007, 03:30 AM
My favorite book at the moment is Enders Game. Its just so orsume..

fosley
October 29th, 2007, 07:17 PM
This is interesting. I haven't even heard of most of the books listed on here.

I've read a ton of books, but most of them were as a kid, so they were more kid-oriented books. I've ready every Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys book I could get my hands on (probably 60 or 70 total), the Sugar Creek Gang books (though they got weird and I quit reading them somewhere in the 30's I think). I read Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (and did the math to discover that these guys were so far under the ocean they were halfway to the moon, and only recently realized they meant it was a 20000 league journey that took place under the sea), Journey to the Center of the Earth, War of the Worlds, Around the World in Eighty Days, and others of that nature.

I've read several of the Tom Sawyer books and several of the Louis L'Amour books (I liked Haunted Mesa best). I've read probably 20-30 Star Wars books (duh!), a couple of the Narnia books (I think the library had 2), a handful of Forgotten Realms books, I think 8 Dragonlance books (I'm on 8 or 9), 1984, a bunch of random sci-fi/fantasy books that I don't know the names of (20-40, not really sure on numbers), a couple Star Trek books, all the Tolkein stuff I've found, Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger (I have like 6 more of that series but haven't read them yet), Interview with a Vampire (I started one about LeStat, but didn't get very far), the Sword of Truth series up to the one where Richard is in that country south of D'harra or whatever, Willow and the first 2 sequels (I'm still missing the final book), and probably a bunch more I've forgotten. I haven't read a ton of normal school reading (no Lord of the Flies), but I've read several historical fiction books, mostly set in the various wars of American history, but a couple written in other countries.

I don't read a lot of non-fiction books. Most non-fiction I get from the internet, and the only non-fiction I can think of that I've read is Origin of the Species, which I'm reading currently (I made it to halfway through chapter 1 and it seems to be getting more interesting). Unless you count "C for Dummies" as non-fiction reading, in which case I've read several dozen non-fiction books. :)