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View Full Version : Gods and heresy.


Alice Shade
September 21st, 2007, 06:53 PM
While looking through some materials about the laws, I`ve found out pretty interesting tidbit...

Classic roman legalise has absolutely no punishment for heresy, whatsoever.

It appears, that ancient Romans held the opinion, that gods are perfectly capable of punishing unbelievers on their own.

Gives a little something to think, considering the history of Inquisition, ne?

Donkydonk
September 23rd, 2007, 04:19 PM
It is clearly because most of todays religion are so eager to have more and more "clients" that they do punish those who do not believe, instead of doing like the romans.....
Dont forget it a buissness after all...

GeoffBoulton
September 23rd, 2007, 06:11 PM
The Roman view certainly makes sense. You would expect that an omnipresent, omnipotent God would be able to punish people all on his own so why does he need us poor, insignificant mortals to do his work for him?

I guess the Theist answer would be that such a God can't punish people in the physical world because it would prove his existence. But miracles are supposed to occur in the physical world and they 'prove' God so why not punishments?

Alice Shade
September 23rd, 2007, 06:35 PM
Why wouldn`t someone get miraculously punished?

Funny enough, those whom God "punishes" are usually quite pious and/or righteous people.

On the other hand, there are more bigots, cutthroats and liars then you can shake a stick at, living "God-blessed" lives.

Makes one wonder, again...

soffee
September 23rd, 2007, 07:59 PM
This is very true. But in all fairness the romans did believe in many different gods their own personalities and character traits. Their gods were not benevolent. They got pissed off with people and then punished them by making them marry thier mothers. (ok so that was a greek god... still)

Alice Shade
September 23rd, 2007, 08:22 PM
Yes, but the point is, that Romans and Greeks had trusted their gods to exert punishment onh their own, if they deemed it necessary.

Whereas Abrahamic religions are quite... Ahem, insistant, on having their followers render punishment for non-believing.

soffee
September 24th, 2007, 06:05 PM
I do agree, but the witch-hunters believed that they were doing the work of god. That they were helping the mislead heretics by scaring them into christianity.

GeoffBoulton
September 24th, 2007, 06:25 PM
Their gods were not benevolent.

But of course, the Christian God IS benevolent? With all the massacres, floods, earthquakes, tidal waves, famine and every other 'act of God' that have been, and continue to be, inflicted upon the world I'm really glad to hear it. Think what the world would be like if he wasn't benevolent? :icon_rolleyes:

SAVAGE
September 24th, 2007, 09:47 PM
The Roman view certainly makes sense. You would expect that an omnipresent, omnipotent God would be able to punish people all on his own so why does he need us poor, insignificant mortals to do his work for him?

I guess the Theist answer would be that such a God can't punish people in the physical world because it would prove his existence. But miracles are supposed to occur in the physical world and they 'prove' God so why not punishments?

This sort of parental massaging double standards is expected isnt it?

darkeye11547
October 1st, 2007, 12:18 AM
Unfortunately, most articles of faith begin to require a sort of Orwellian doublethink once they've been around long enough for some of the things that once fell upon faith fall into the realm of fact.