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rzm61
September 12th, 2008, 06:20 PM
“Some say Google is God,” Sergey Brin once said. “Others say Google is Satan.”

The confusion about Google’s identity may not be quite that Manichean, but it does run deep. The company, which today celebrates the tenth anniversary of its incorporation, remains an enigma despite the Everest-sized pile of press coverage that has been mounded around it. People can’t even agree what industry it’s in. The many businesses that see the young company as an actual or potential competitor include software houses, advertising agencies, telephone companies, newspapers, TV networks, book publishers, movie studios, credit card processors, and Internet firms of all stripes. If your business involves information, you probably fear (and admire) Google.

The sheer breadth of Google’s influence and activity - just this past week it unveiled its own Web browser, introduced face-recognition software, and shot a satellite into orbit - can easily be interpreted as evidence that it is an entirely new kind of business, one that transcends and redefines all traditional categories. But while Google is an unusual company in many ways, when you boil down its business strategy, you find that it’s not quite as mysterious as it seems. The way Google makes money is straightforward: It brokers and publishes advertisements through digital media. More than 99 percent of its sales have come from the fees it charges advertisers for using its network to get their messages out on the Internet.

Google’s protean appearance is not a reflection of its core business. Rather, it stems from the vast number of complements to its core business. Complements are, to put it simply, any products or services that tend be consumed together. Think hot dogs and mustard, or houses and mortgages. For Google, literally everything that happens on the Internet is a complement to its main business. The more things that people and companies do online, the more ads they see and the more money Google makes. In addition, as Internet activity increases, Google collects more data on consumers’ needs and behavior and can tailor its ads more precisely, strengthening its competitive advantage and further increasing its income. As more and more products and services are delivered digitally over computer networks — entertainment, news, software programs, financial transactions — Google’s range of complements expands into ever more industry sectors. That's why cute little Google has morphed into The Omnigoogle.



Full article here:
http://www.roughtype.com/archives/2008/09/google_at_10.php

sudikics
September 12th, 2008, 09:05 PM
Full article here:
http://www.roughtype.com/archives/2008/09/google_at_10.php
The expansion of the Brin quote above is what I think is most interesting.

"I think people tend to exaggerate Google's significance in both directions. Some say Google is God. Others say Google is Satan. But if they think Google is too powerful, remember that with search engines, unlike other companies, all it takes is a single click to go to another search engine. People come to Google because they choose to. We don't trick them."
-Sergey Brin

Tsar Phalanxia
September 12th, 2008, 11:09 PM
Nice, we now have an Omni- definition to call our own. Googlists - 1 Organised Religion - 0

sudikics
September 12th, 2008, 11:24 PM
Nice, we now have an Omni- definition to call our own. Googlists - 1 Organised Religion - 0
QFT.

Oh, another quote from te article:

The Omnigoogle is not just out to make oodles of money; it's on a crusade - to liberate information for the masses - and is convinced of its righteousness in pursuing its cause. Depending on your point of view as you look forward to the next ten years, you'll find that either comforting or discomforting.

rzm61
September 13th, 2008, 06:56 AM
I LOVE GOOGLE!


That is all. :D

Dr Goofy Mofo
September 13th, 2008, 08:53 AM
Awesome! We have won it is over!