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View Full Version : Google Offers $10 million Prize Fund for Ideas that will Change the World


rzm61
September 25th, 2008, 08:19 PM
This week, as part of their tenth birthday celebrations, Google have announce the launch of project 10^100 (ten to the 100th), an innovative scheme designed to inspire and fund the development of ideas that will help to change the world.

The internet giant has called on members of the public to share their ideas for solutions that will help as many people as possible in the global community, offering a $10 million prize pool to back the development of those chosen as winners.

When announcing the scheme live on CNN yesterday morning, Bethany Poole, Project Marketing Manager for Google, and Andy Berndt, MD of Google’s Creative Lab, were keen to stress that any idea that could be developed to benefit the global community would be considered.

"These ideas can be big or small, technology-driven or brilliantly simple -- but they need to have impact.

"We know there are countless brilliant ideas that need funding and support to come to fruition."

The project’s website (http://www.project10tothe100.com) asks entrants to classify their ideas into one of eight categories listed as Community, Opportunity, Energy, Environment, Health, Education, Shelter and Everything Else. Goals for the project such as building communities, generating clean energy, giving people opportunity and access to education, helping people lead healthier lives and promoting a sustainable global ecosystem are also suggested.

Members of the public have until 20th October to submit their ideas by completing a simple form and answering a few short questions about their idea. Entrants can also include a link to a 30 second video either demonstrating their idea in action or giving a more detailed explanation.

Entries will be accepted in 25 languages and Google have placed no limit on the number of ideas any one individual can share.

An advisory board will work with Google employees to narrow the entrants down to the top 100, with the results to be announced on 27th January, 2009. It will then be up to the public to vote for their favourites before 2nd February when the top 20 ideas will be passed on to a panel of judges to whittle down.




http://www.money.co.uk/article/1001529-google-offers-10-million-dollar-prize-fund-for-ideas-that-will-change-the-world.htm

AlectheSpartan
September 26th, 2008, 02:47 AM
Praise Google.

newspecies
September 26th, 2008, 04:59 AM
I believe if the scientists take as much time as needed to make a enlargment potion for fruits and other items of food... then we could end world hunger :D

Now I mean like a growth potion for the plant not the food itself... Or we could find a way to get plants to fertilize in the deserts and other rural places that don't thrive on water and just grow the food there.

Puck the Pooka
September 26th, 2008, 04:46 PM
Might we use this thread to hash out and criticize idea's?

rzm61
September 26th, 2008, 05:13 PM
Might we use this thread to hash out and criticize idea's?

Absolutely!



Here's an idea.
If somehow industrilized hemp was legalized, it would no bullshit no lie change the world.

We could make hemp oil gasoline, which would help get rid of these gas prices and move onto a renewable energy source. Also it could help end a lot of hunger, hemp seeds contain one of the highest sources of protein, also it has special fatty acids that help clean out cholesterol ...there is really nothing but benifits coming from hemp. However the fat cats who have their money in the pockets of politicians wont allow this to happen, because they want their profits from their companies. However if they would open their eyes and see the bigger picture, they would realize they could invest in hemp and make profits! Fucking idiots.


Edit:
Here is some reading material about my little rant.

http://www.thetruthseeker.co.uk/print.asp?ID=3774

sudikics
September 27th, 2008, 01:23 PM
I submitted an idea I had after reading A Clockwork Orange. I hope it helps.

Puck the Pooka
September 27th, 2008, 04:52 PM
Absolutely!



Here's an idea.
If somehow industrilized hemp was legalized, it would no bullshit no lie change the world.

http://www.thetruthseeker.co.uk/print.asp?ID=3774

I don't think hemp ideas will win the contest, because hemp makes pot, and that's politically divisive, no matter how you cut it. And it would require a miracle in congress for something like that to happen.

Now algae can do much of what you have described. and it can be used for partial carbon capture. It also makes much better use of space than conventional crops like hemp. Only draw back . . . it's not nearly as fun to smoke.:(

http://www.oilgae.com/

rzm61
September 27th, 2008, 06:18 PM
I don't think hemp ideas will win the contest, because hemp makes pot, and that's politically divisive, no matter how you cut it. And it would require a miracle in congress for something like that to happen.

I do agree that it will take a miracle, however I disagree that hemp makes pot...simply because it's not true. Hemp and cannabis are completely different. Industrialized hemp doesn't bud like cannabis, if you were to smoke hemp, you would just get a really bad headache.


The legalization of cannabis (or if you want to use the slang term 'marijuana') would be about the pot. Which if they sold it legally, not only would it take away a major black market and put a lot of small time dealers out of business thus saving money spent on cops and drug busts, but it would generate a nice revenue that is needed in todays economy.

Tsar Phalanxia
September 27th, 2008, 06:41 PM
I do agree that it will take a miracle, however I disagree that hemp makes pot...simply because it's not true. Hemp and cannabis are completely different. Industrialized hemp doesn't bud like cannabis, if you were to smoke hemp, you would just get a really bad headache.


You would actually asphyxiate and die, before you got high. (Wow, that rhymes!)

rzm61
September 27th, 2008, 09:17 PM
You would actually asphyxiate and die, before you got high. (Wow, that rhymes!)

[citation needed]


Never heard about all that.

Puck the Pooka
September 27th, 2008, 10:29 PM
I do agree that it will take a miracle, however I disagree that hemp makes pot...simply because it's not true. Hemp and cannabis are completely different. Industrialized hemp doesn't bud like cannabis, if you were to smoke hemp, you would just get a really bad headache.

But it still takes up farmland that we need for food, and it doesn't capture carbon directly from a carbon producer.

Tsar Phalanxia
September 28th, 2008, 12:30 PM
[citation needed]


Never heard about all that.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/sep/25/food.foodanddrink

But the crop definitely does not get the user high. "Unfortunately you'd probably die of asphyxiation before you smoked enough to feel anything," said Braham.

@Puck: Touché.

rzm61
September 28th, 2008, 01:59 PM
But it still takes up farmland that we need for food, and it doesn't capture carbon directly from a carbon producer.

Question. How much farmland is needed exactly? Because you don't need a shit load of hemp, sure the more the better. But remember 1 acre of hemp is about equal to 4.1 acres of trees. And another plus, hemp only takes one season to grow, trees a lifetime.

Puck the Pooka
September 28th, 2008, 04:18 PM
Question. How much farmland is needed exactly? Because you don't need a shit load of hemp, sure the more the better. But remember 1 acre of hemp is about equal to 4.1 acres of trees. And another plus, hemp only takes one season to grow, trees a lifetime.

I'm not talking about tree's. I'm comparing hemp to algae. Algae is grown in a bioreactor. It can be, and is better suited for, non-arable land. It can be harvested every day, not every year. It also makes much much better use of the land than any land grown crop. From 5,000 to 15,000 gallons per acre, per year. Check out http://www.electricitybook.com/algae-biodiesel/

As for replacing trees with crops, this might be more efficiant carbon sequestration, but it can destroy habitats. Tree's provide structures for all sorts of bio-diversity. It's my opinion that it is better to leave the tree's alone, and let nature alone, as much as possible.

rzm61
September 28th, 2008, 04:26 PM
Where the hell did you get the idea about replacing trees with crops? :icon_lol:

Trees are important and shouldn't be cut down. Especially the rain forest.

Sister Faith
September 28th, 2008, 11:01 PM
Question. How much farmland is needed exactly? Because you don't need a shit load of hemp, sure the more the better. But remember 1 acre of hemp is about equal to 4.1 acres of trees. And another plus, hemp only takes one season to grow, trees a lifetime.

Don't forget that hemp will grow well in poor soil, thus cutting down on the need for industrial fertilizers and pesticides.

Algae is grown in a bioreactor. It can be, and is better suited for, non-arable land. It can be harvested every day, not every year. It also makes much much better use of the land than any land grown crop. From 5,000 to 15,000 gallons per acre, per year. Check out http://www.electricitybook.com/algae-biodiesel/


Isn't algae supposed to be a good pollution digester as well?

I think any idea that works with nature (ie sustainable farming practices, etc) instead of against it (use of industrial fertilizers/pesticides) would have the greatest impact on the global community.

rmw
September 28th, 2008, 11:40 PM
rzm, while hemp and cannabis are different, most people either don't know or don't care about that. For those who would be economically threatened by the use of industrial hemp, all they would need to do is whine that hemp = marijuana = the downfall of society.

As for ending world hunger, it's going to take a lot more than growing bigger foods or hemp. When looking at hunger, it's a problem of distribution and not necessarily a lack of food. You have corrupt officials stealing the food and distributing to their cronies, instead of the people who need it. In the case of Somalia, you have pirates boarding ships carrying food aid and making off with it. newspecies had a good idea of making crops more tolerant to harsh desert conditions, but in many countries facing food shortages, you still face problems of natural disasters or wars ruining any harvest. Burma is an example of this: typhoons destroyed the rice crop, yet the government is so paranoid about letting foreigners in, they intentionally delayed aid. And what aid did get in tended to be pilfered by government officials. If you want to end world hunger, it's not about growing better crops. We have the technology to do that. It's figuring out a way to stop corrruption, and I doubt the answer lies in a test tube or computer program. /rant

Puck the Pooka
September 29th, 2008, 12:07 AM
Isn't algae supposed to be a good pollution digested as well?

Not only that, the stuff forms in the mouths of rivers and other places with sewage problems. Algae eutrification is a huge environmental mess. If it had value, than people would suck it up and sell it before it started causing environmental issues.

One company in New Zealand (http://www.ecosherpa.com/green-energy/algae-biofuel-from-sewage/) has started just that.

Sister Faith
September 29th, 2008, 12:17 AM
Not only that, the stuff forms in the mouths of rivers and other places with sewage problems. Algae eutrification is a huge environmental mess. If it had value, than people would suck it up and sell it before it started causing environmental issues.

One company in New Zealand (http://www.ecosherpa.com/green-energy/algae-biofuel-from-sewage/) has started just that.

Very interesting idea. Anything that uses the waste that we humans keep fowling the planet with is a good thing. But I'm wondering what the emissions are when this fuel is burned. Will it cut down on air pollution?

rmw
September 29th, 2008, 12:22 AM
Very interesting idea. Anything that uses the waste that we humans keep fowling the planet with is a good thing. But I'm wondering what the emissions are when this fuel is burned. Will it cut down on air pollution?

I think algae is supposed to have less emissions than fossil fuels.

Puck the Pooka
September 29th, 2008, 01:58 AM
I think algae is supposed to have less emissions than fossil fuels.

Algae is only useful because it's lipids can be turned into diesel, it's starches turned into ethanol, and it's proteins turned into feed, or burned. So it's out put in terms of hydrocarbons and methane will mimic out puts of other diesel, ethanol, or animal fart producing products.

Now if you burned the diesel, ethanol or protein in a power plant, that was hooked up to bio reactor that captured the carbon released and used it to produce more algae, than you'd have no harmful air pollution at all. In fact you'd be helping the air by releasing oxygen.

rzm61
September 29th, 2008, 04:51 AM
Don't forget that hemp will grow well in poor soil, thus cutting down on the need for industrial fertilizers and pesticides.


Yes yes!
Best part, is the roots penetrate deep into the soil, leave it fine when harvested for next season.

rzm, while hemp and cannabis are different, most people either don't know or don't care about that. For those who would be economically threatened by the use of industrial hemp, all they would need to do is whine that hemp = marijuana = the downfall of society.

That's why we need to educate!
Hemp could help us tremendously.

Tsar Phalanxia
September 29th, 2008, 08:57 PM
In the case of Somalia, you have pirates boarding ships carrying food aid and making off with it.

Those pirates also stole 37 Ukrainian tanks that were on their way to Kenya.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/27/world/africa/27pirates.html?partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

rmw
September 30th, 2008, 01:40 AM
Those pirates also stole 37 Ukrainian tanks that were on their way to Kenya.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/27/world/africa/27pirates.html?partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

Yeah, I read that article a few days ago. Here's an update: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/30/world/africa/30pirate.html?ref=world

I think of more interest than the pirates is where those arms were going, because from what the article states, it seems doubtful that Kenya was going to be the end recipient of those tanks and grenade launchers.